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Sunday, June 16, 2024

Self-Control, Self-Discipline and Self-Restraint

I teach a young wives Bible class on Sunday mornings and one of the young women asked me if we could study self-control, self-discipline and self-restraint, more specifically how to get or have them in our lives.  Of course, I said yes and started delving into what God's Word says on the topic.  It didn't take me long to realize that I too, needed a reminder on the subject.

Here are my teaching notes.  (Please understand that my teaching notes are just that and are not a complete lesson.) Feel free to add your comments or ask any questions you might have.  I may not have the answers, but together we'll turn to God's Word and find what He has to say.  I firmly believe that God's Word addresses every issue either directly or indirectly.

Without further ado ... my teaching notes on lesson 1 ...

We approached the subject with the following statement, 'Our self-control, self-discipline and self-restraint or lack of it affects every area of our lives' and then we shared our thoughts on it.   Then we talked about what lack of the three 'self's' might look like in real life ...

Poor Health ... Our health, to an extent, will be directly related to how well we control our appetites, take care of ourselves and control our laziness.

Poor Relationships ... Our relationships will be affected by how well we control our tempers, words, actions and in marriage, sexual desires.

Unfaithfulness to God ... we get to choose every day whether we remain faithful to God.  Do we control the influences that have the potential to pull us away from Him?  We also talked about Christians who neglect services for a reason that they would never dream of missing work for.

Poor Work Ethics ... dishonesty in the workplace, etc.

Self-indulgent living ... doing what makes 'me' happy instead of what is pleasing to God.

We used each of these categories as a springboard and had some really good discussion.

We talked about the fact that self-discipline, self-control and self-restraint is what we need the most but is often what we want the least.

We also talked about the fact that God needs self-disciplined men and women.

Then we looked at the following Scripture ... 

Proverbs 16:32 (NASB) … He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit than he who captures a city.

Proverbs 16:32 (NKJV) … He who is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit than he who takes a city.

‘slow to anger’suppress' its motion and doesn’t let anger rule, doesn’t take or seek revenge, shows himself ready to forgive injuries

‘he who rules his spirit’controls his own desires, affections and passions

Patience is better than power, and controlling one’s temper is better than 'capturing a city'.

The person that restrains his or her thoughts and actions is far greater than he who wins a battle in war.  That's a powerful statement and shows us the importance placed on restraining ourselves in every area of our lives.

Sadly, our society and culture have become a 'me' focused world which flies in the face of all that God teaches us in His Word.

Victory over self is hard!  It calls for self-control, self-discipline and self-restraint.

Self is a worthy opponent and a strong enemy.  We should never underestimate self.

We wrapped the class up by sharing ways to have better self-control, self-discipline and self-restraint.  Some of those ways were ...

Being a student of God's Word.  God's Word is an excellent tutor and when we find ourselves struggling, we need to run to His Word.  I have absolutely no hope of conquering the three 'self's' without the help of His Word.  We talk to God through prayer, and He talks to us through His Word.

Prayer.  Admitting to God and asking for His help when we're struggling with the three 'self's' is crucial.  

Fellowshipping with other faithful Christians.  It's harder to make everything about 'self' when we have regular fellowship with other Christians.

We talked about what not having self-control, self-discipline and self-restraint might look like in one's life vs what having these three looked like in our lives.  We all decided that we would rather have the consequences of having the three 'self's' in our lives rather than the consequences of not having them in our lives!

It was a good class, and we left it knowing that we were not alone in this struggle and that there was hope and help for the journey! 

Next week, we're going to talk about controlling what comes out of our mouths ... self-control, self-discipline, and self-restraint definitely applies to what we say!

There will be several classes in this series, typically I will post them on Sunday evening or Monday of each week.  I hope you'll come back for more.

May God be glorified in all that we do!

patsy @ From This Heart of Mine

Thursday, May 30, 2024

Mary of Bethany: Choosing the Better, Lesson 3

Mary of Bethany:  Choosing the Better!

By Patsy Norwood  © 2024  All Rights Reserved!

Lesson 3

John 12:1-8 (Also Mark 14:3-9 and Matthew 26:6-13)

Thus far, we’ve seen Mary ‘choose the better’ at a supper in her home, when her world lay crumbled at her feet and this week, we’re going to see her in yet another situation in which she ‘chooses the better.’

Let’s get started with a little background …

Jesus’ public ministry is about to come to a close.  He started this last journey to Jerusalem via Samaria and Galilee teaching and healing along the way.  We catch up with Him here in these passages as He makes a stop at Bethany right outside of Jerusalem.

Note:  This account is recorded in John, Mark and Matthew.  We’ll utilize all three as we study.

John 12:1 Then, six days before the Passover, Jesus came to Bethany, where Lazarus was who had been dead, whom He had raised from the dead.

In our modern-day calendar this would have been on our Friday/Saturday time frame.

Notice the specifics, this puts Jesus right outside of Jerusalem connecting Him with the Lazarus whom He had recently raised from the dead.

John 12:2 There they made Him a supper; and Martha served, but Lazarus was one of those who sat at the table with Him.

Who are ‘they?’  Research indicates it was friends of Jesus and Lazarus.

We see that Martha is serving, and that Lazarus is there as well.

The parallel verse in Matthew 26:6 adds … And when Jesus was in Bethany at the house of Simon the leper,

The parallel verse in Mark 14:3a adds … And being in Bethany at the house of Simon the leper,

Both Matthew 26:6 and Mark 14:3a tell us that this meal is taking place not in the home of Mary, Martha and Lazarus, but instead in the home of Simon the leper who also lives in Bethany.

Who was Simon the leper? Obviously, by reading the text we can see that he was a former leper.  I believe he was a ‘former’ leper because lepers were not allowed to have contact with anyone.  Jesus, Mary, Martha, Lazarus and possibly others being in Simon’s home indicates he no longer had leprosy.

Since Martha took an active role in serving the meal, speculation is that Simon was a member of the family or a very close friend.

Before we move on, let’s sum up where we are …

It’s 6 days before the Passover and the last week of Jesus’ life on earth …

Jesus is in Bethany at the home of Simon the leper …

Lazarus was there …

Martha was there helping serve a meal …

But where was Mary … we’re about to find out!

John 12:3 Then Mary took a pound of very costly oil of spikenard, anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped His feet with her hair. And the house was filled with the fragrance of the oil.

Here comes Mary!  There’s a lot to unpack in these verses, so hold on …

Up to this point Mary has not been mentioned.  Was she helping serve the meal as Martha was or was she just late to the occasion?  The Bible doesn’t tell us.  What we do know is that out of the blue and seemingly unexpectedly, Mary came in and ‘anointed the feet of Jesus with a very costly perfume and used her hair to wipe His feet.

Have you ever felt so grateful to and full of love for someone that you yearned to do whatever you could to please them?  I think that’s where Mary is in her relationship with Jesus.  I pray for a heart like that toward Jesus.

The literal meaning of the word ‘anoint’ is to smear or rub with oil or an oil substance. 

Spikenard oil was a perfume highly prized by the ancients grown in what we know as the Himalaya Mountains.  It would have had to be transported to Jerusalem which would have added to the expense.  This was no ‘knock-off’ or ‘diluted’ version Mary used, it was the pure stuff.  (This adds to the belief that Mary, Martha and Lazarus were somewhat wealthy.)

The parallel verse in Matthew 26:7 adds … a woman came to Him having an alabaster flask of very costly fragrant oil, and she poured it on His head as He sat at the table.

“she poured it on His head” … The anointing of the head was a symbol of honor.

“as He sat at the table” … sitting at the table then is different then sitting at the table now.  Then, sitting at the table meant they were reclining on floor cushions and carpets while they ate off of a low table.

The parallel verse in Mark 14:3b adds … as He sat at the table, a woman came having an alabaster flask of very costly oil of spikenard. Then she broke the flask and poured it on His head.

One other detail mentioned here that hasn’t been mentioned before is that Mary “broke the flask and poured it on His head.”    According to the Pulpit commentary…  “It would seem most probable that Mary first wiped the feet of Jesus, wetting them with her tears, and then wiping off the dust and then anointing them; and that she then proceeded to break the neck of the cruse, and to pour its whole contents on his head.”

In my understanding of hospitality during that time, offering a way for a traveler to clean their feet upon arrival was part of what was expected under the umbrella of hospitality.  Since the common mode of transportation was walking, it would make sense that offering a way for the traveler to remove the dust, grime and possible mud from their feet would be a hospitable thing to do.

One has to wonder why Mary chose to anoint Jesus in the manner that she did?  I think it’s rooted in her love and dedication to Him.  She did and gave the best she could … isn’t that what we should do as well?  Motivated by our love for Jesus, shouldn’t we do and give the best we can?

John 12:4 - 5 But one of His disciples, Judas Iscariot, Simon’s son, who would betray Him, said, “Why was this fragrant oil not sold for three hundred denarii and given to the poor?”

Parallel verses, Mark 14:4-5 reads:  But there were some who were indignant among themselves, and said, “Why was this fragrant oil wasted?  For it might have been sold for more than three hundred denarii and given to the poor.” And they criticized her sharply.

Parallel verses, Matthew 26:8-9 reads: But when His disciples saw it, they were indignant, saying, “Why this waste? For this fragrant oil might have been sold for much and given to the poor.”

In doing research on these verses, I found that the consensus was that Judas had persuaded some of the other disciples to go along with his objections, but that he was the ringleader.  His negative influence had infected some of the other disciples!

It seems that Judas was ready and willing to stir up trouble over what Mary did, but why?

“And they criticized her sharply” … we just read that in Mark 14:5. Poor Mary!  How did Jesus’ disciples let themselves fall victim to this kind of behavior?   Judas it seems was very good at “rallying the troops” for his purpose! 

Satan likes nothing better than to see Christians pick away at and turn against each other over things like this!

Another take-away from these verses … be careful who you follow!

John 12:6 This he said, not that he cared for the poor, but because he was a thief, and had the money box; and he used to take what was put in it.

Now, we see the why of Judas’ behavior!  Judas wasn’t concerned for the poor as he had said, he was a thief in disguise in charge of the money box, which he used for his benefit.  It seems his purpose was to get his hands on the money, under the guise of helping the poor.

John 12:7 But Jesus said, “Let her alone; she has kept this for the day of My burial.

Parallel verse, Matthew 26: 10 reads: But when Jesus was aware of it, He said to them, “Why do you trouble the woman? For she has done a good work for Me.

Parallel verse, Matthew 26: 12 reads: For in pouring this fragrant oil on My body, she did it for My burial.

Parallel verse, Mark 14: 6 reads: But Jesus said, “Let her alone. Why do you trouble her? She has done a good work for Me.

Parallel verse, Mark 14: 8 reads:  She has done what she could. She has come beforehand to anoint My body for burial.

Jesus notices that Mary is being harassed and criticized and steps in.  He tells His disciples to leave her alone, that what she had done was in essence, anointing His body for burial.

Mary had done a good work, she had done what she could.

Did Mary do what she did with the idea and intention of anointing Jesus’ body for burial?  I personally don’t think so.   Mary didn’t know what the week ahead was going to entail.  I think Mary loved the Lord and wanted to do what she could for Him.  This was something she could do and acted on it.

Do we do what we can for the Lord?  Jesus took Mary’s efforts and act and turned them into something that served a purpose in His overall plan of salvation for mankind.

Lesson to us:  God can and does use what we choose to do for Him in His overall plan of salvation for mankind.

John 12: 8 For the poor you have with you always, but Me you do not have always.”

Parallel verse Matthew 26:11 reads: For you have the poor with you always, but Me you do not have always.”

Parallel verse, Mark 14: 7 reads:  For you have the poor with you always, and whenever you wish you may do them good; but Me you do not have always.”

Christ is and should be our highest priority!

In closing let’s look at the following verses about Mary …

Mark 14:9 reads: “Assuredly, I say to you, wherever this gospel is preached in the whole world, what this woman has done will also be told as a memorial to her.”

Matthew 26: 13 reads:  Assuredly, I say to you, wherever this gospel is preached in the whole world, what this woman has done will also be told as a memorial to her.”

What a legacy Mary left for us to consider and follow!

This is the last lesson in our study of Mary of Bethany so let’s close it out with some take-aways from Mary’s life, influence and example …

She had a choice, and she chose the better.

She was reprimanded openly in front of others, yet she remained faithful.

She was willing to take rebuke in order to sit at the Lord’s feet.

The Lord intervened on her behalf.

She loved and was dedicated to the Lord.

She was eager to learn.

Mary had a heart for Jesus.

Mary was obedient to what Jesus said for her to do.

Mary ran to Jesus in her brokenness.

Mary was criticized for doing good.

Mary did the best she knew how to do.

Mary gave the best she could.

Mary was selfless.

Mary is known for her love, faith and dedication to the Lord, are we?

This study has left me wanting to be more like Mary in her love, dedication and commitment to Christ.  How has Mary inspired you?

I hope you’ve enjoyed today's lesson as well as the whole study.  Don’t forget to leave a comment. And if you’ve enjoyed this study, please share the link with other ladies who you think might enjoy it as well.

We’ve taken an in-depth look at Mary of Bethany and saw her heart for Jesus.  Since Martha is often looked upon as the less spiritual one of the two sisters, we’re going to delve into what God’s word says about her in the fall.  I'm deliberately waiting until fall for our study on Martha though, it'll be easier to look clearly at Martha if Mary is not fresh on our minds.

In the meantime, after a few weeks break, we're going to take a look at what Scripture says about Phoebe (Romans 16:1-2).  I'll meet you back here on the first Thursday in July with that lesson! 

Thank you for being a part of this study, may God be glorified in all that we do!

patsy @ From This Heart of Mine

Sources used for this study:

Various translations of the Holy Bible

Various commentaries

Dictionary of New Testament Background, Editors: Craig A Evans & Stanley E. Porter

Archaeological Study Bible

All the Women of the Bible by Edith Deen

Daughters of Eve by Lottie Beth Hobbs

Halley’s Bible Handbook by H. H. Halley

Who’s Who in the Bible by Philip Comfort & Walter A. Elwell

Thursday, May 23, 2024

Mary of Bethany: Choosing the Better! Lesson 2

Mary of Bethany:  Choosing the Better!

By Patsy Norwood  © 2024  All Rights Reserved!

Lesson 2

John 11: 1-45 (NKJV)

In our last lesson we saw Mary ‘choose the better’ at a supper in her home, this week, we’re going to see Mary ‘choose the better’ in a completely different situation. 

Let’s get started …

Verse 1 … Now a certain man was sick, Lazarus of Bethany, the town of Mary and her sister Martha.

Do you notice the specifics in this verse … Lazarus of Bethany, the town of Mary and her sister Martha?  These specifics were necessary as the name Lazarus was a common one at the time.  In my opinion, God wanted us to know which Lazarus He was talking about.  Our God is a God of specifics!

2 It was that Mary who anointed the Lord with fragrant oil and wiped His feet with her hair, whose brother Lazarus was sick.

We’ll read more about Mary anointing the Lord in a future lesson.  This again seems to be for the purpose of identifying the correct people.   We already talked about there being more than one Lazarus at that time.  The same can be said about the name Mary.  Mary was a popular name and there were several women who went by that name.

Mary of Bethany is sometimes confused with Mary Magdelene who bathed the Lord’s feet with her tears in Galilee at the home of Simon the Pharisee in Luke 7:36-50, but when we do further study we see that they are two different women.

This verse also reaffirms that Lazarus, Mary and Martha were siblings.

“Lazarus was sick” … apparently, as we will shortly see, he was seriously ill.

 3 Therefore the sisters sent to Him, saying, “Lord, behold, he whom You love is sick.”

The sisters, Mary and Martha, sent word to Jesus.  Notice they didn’t ask anything of Him, they just sent word that ‘he whom You love is sick.’

This reminds me of the phone call one gets when a loved one is nearing the point of death.  The underlying message is that if you want to see them alive, you need to come.

Was this what Mary and Martha were implying when they sent word?  We don’t know, but it makes sense, doesn’t it?

4 When Jesus heard that, He said, “This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of God, that the Son of God may be glorified through it.”

“Not unto death” meant that death would not be the end of the matter.  Hold that thought as we continue.

“but for the glory of God, that the Son of God may be glorified through it”  Lazarus’ sickness was going to bring glory to God.

Do we look at the hard things we go through as a way of bringing glory to God?

5 Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.

This verse doesn’t say that Jesus loved the Lazarus family!  It says He loved Martha, and her sister and Lazarus.  He named them individually.  He loved them individually.  Jesus’ love for each of them was personal and individual.

Today, our Heavenly Father loves ‘mankind’ as a whole, but He also loves His followers individually.  He knows them by name, He has a personal one on one love for each of us.

To me, that is just so comforting!  In fact, it makes me smile all over!  Jesus loves ME, with all my quirks and issues, this I know, for the Bible tells me so …

Verses 6 – 16 gives us details of Jesus decision to delay going to Lazarus immediately and the discussion He had with His disciples as a result.  Read the following verses and then we’ll pick back up with verse 17 where we find Mary and Martha coming back into the picture.

So, when He heard that he was sick, He stayed two more days in the place where He was.  Then after this He said to the disciples, “Let us go to Judea again.”  The disciples said to Him, “Rabbi, lately the Jews sought to stone You, and are You going there again?”  Jesus answered, “Are there not twelve hours in the day? If anyone walks in the day, he does not stumble, because he sees the light of this world.  But if one walks in the night, he stumbles, because the light is not in him.”  These things He said, and after that He said to them, “Our friend Lazarus sleeps, but I go that I may wake him up.”  Then His disciples said, “Lord, if he sleeps he will get well.” However, Jesus spoke of his death, but they thought that He was speaking about taking rest in sleep.  Then Jesus said to them plainly, “Lazarus is dead.  And I am glad for your sakes that I was not there, that you may believe. Nevertheless let us go to him.”  Then Thomas, who is called the Twin, said to his fellow disciples, “Let us also go, that we may die with Him.”

17 So when Jesus came, He found that he had already been in the tomb four days.

But Jesus already knew that Lazarus had been in the tomb for 4 days, didn’t He?  Why the delay?  Was it to make what He was about to do undisputable.  I think so!  Jesus’ hesitation had a higher goal and purpose.

Verses 18 - 19 Now Bethany was near Jerusalem, about two miles away.   And many of the Jews had joined the women around Martha and Mary, to comfort them concerning their brother.

Lazarus’ family was well-known and wealthy which meant that there was likely a large crowd present.  Notice who was there …

Jews:  the very people Jesus’ was trying to convince that He was the promised Messiah.

Women:  friends and acquaintances who were no doubt there to comfort Mary and Martha. 

If we look at this scene from a ‘Christ’s purpose on earth’ point of view, we will recognize that lots of people gathered together meant opportunities for Christ to teach, convince and show that He was the promised Messiah, the Son of God.

20 Then Martha, as soon as she heard that Jesus was coming, went and met Him, but Mary was sitting in the house.

This seems to go along with the speculation in the introduction of Martha being older and more practical.  Here we see her in a take charge, do what needs to be done mode.

When Martha heard that Jesus was coming, she went and met Him, but Mary did not, Mary sat in the house.  It was customary for people to sit in times of intense grief.  Was this the reason Mary was sitting in the house?  Had she not heard that Jesus was near, or was her grief so deep that she was unable to respond?

We all grieve in different ways, don’t we?  It seems these two sisters did as well.

Verses 21-27 relate the conversation Martha and Jesus had which culminated with Martha making the confession that she believed that Jesus was the Son of God.  Read those verses below and we’ll pick back up with Martha and Mary in verse 28.

Now Martha said to Jesus, “Lord, if You had been here, my brother would not have died.  But even now I know that whatever You ask of God, God will give You.”  Jesus said to her, “Your brother will rise again.”  Martha said to Him, “I know that he will rise again in the resurrection at the last day.”  Jesus said to her, “I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in Me, though he may die, he shall live.  And whoever lives and believes in Me shall never die. Do you believe this?”  She said to Him, “Yes, Lord, I believe that You are the Christ, the Son of God, who is to come into the world.”

28 And when she had said these things, she went her way and secretly called Mary her sister, saying, “The Teacher has come and is calling for you.”

Secretly, Martha went to Mary, that must have taken some doing as indications are that Mary was surrounded by those trying to comfort her.  Can’t you just see Martha quietly slip in next to Mary and possibly whisper in her ear, “The Teacher has come and is calling for you.”

29 As soon as she heard that, she arose quickly and came to Him.

That’s all it took!  The mention of Jesus and the knowledge that He was calling for her sent her making an exit and heading to Him.

30 Now Jesus had not yet come into the town, but was in the place where Martha met Him.

Where had Martha met Jesus, was it at the tomb where Lazarus’ body was? Personally,  I don’t think so and I’ll explain why a little later. 

Obviously, Martha shared Jesus’ location with Mary along with Jesus’ request or else Mary would not have known where to go.

31 Then the Jews who were with her in the house, and comforting her, when they saw that Mary rose up quickly and went out, followed her, saying, “She is going to the tomb to weep there.”

Martha’s ‘secret’ attempt to allow Mary to go to Jesus unobserved was not successful.  The people noticed and followed her.

32 Then, when Mary came where Jesus was, and saw Him, she fell down at His feet, saying to Him, “Lord, if You had been here, my brother would not have died.”

Can’t you just feel Mary’s heartache and brokenness?

Can’t you just see the love, faith and trust Mary had in Jesus … ‘If You had been here ….’

Verses 33-36 Jesus sees Mary weeping and those with her weeping.  The term ‘weeping’ here means to wail aloud.  Mary was wailing aloud as were the Jews who accompanied her.  This had to be heartbreaking and even distressing to Jesus!  When those we love hurt, we hurt too, don’t we?  It was the same with Jesus.

Therefore, when Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who came with her weeping, He groaned in the spirit and was troubled. And He said, “Where have you laid him?” They said to Him, “Lord, come and see.”  Jesus wept.  Then the Jews said, “See how He loved him!”

“Where have you laid him?”  They said to Him, “Lord, come and see.”    … This is why I don’t think Martha had met Jesus at Lazarus tomb.  This, to me, indicates that they were not at Lazarus’ tomb.  They may have been close, but not at it.

 In these verses we get a glimpse of Jesus’ tenderness, love, and emotions.

Lesson for us:  Jesus is not untouched by our trials and distresses!  What a comforting thought!

Verse 37  After noting in verses 33-36 how the Jews following Mary concluded that Jesus loved Lasarus, Jesus is then  challenged by some non-believers (likely Jews also) who had ‘heard’ of the miracles He had done.

And some of them said, “Could not this Man, who opened the eyes of the blind, also have kept this man from dying?”

Verses 38 – 40 Jesus, full of emotions, groaning has a conversation with Martha.  This conversation was not only for Martha but for those listening as well.

Then Jesus, again groaning in Himself, came to the tomb. It was a cave, and a stone lay against it.  Jesus said, “Take away the stone.”  Martha, the sister of him who was dead, said to Him, “Lord, by this time there is a stench, for he has been dead four days.”   Jesus said to her, “Did I not say to you that if you would believe you would see the glory of God?”

Verses 41-44 Jesus brings Lazarus back to life!

Then they took away the stone from the place where the dead man was lying. And Jesus lifted up His eyes and said, “Father, I thank You that You have heard Me. And I know that You always hear Me, but because of the people who are standing by I said this, that they may believe that You sent Me.”  Now when He had said these things, He cried with a loud voice, “Lazarus, come forth!” And he who had died came out bound hand and foot with graveclothes, and his face was wrapped with a cloth. Jesus said to them, “Loose him, and let him go.”

Even the command to loosen Lazarus’ burial wrappings had a purpose.  Personal involvement, a hands-on touch would confirm to everyone present that this was not some kind of mirage, but a genuine resurrection.

45 Then many of the Jews who had come to Mary, and had seen the things Jesus did, believed in Him.

“the Jews who had come to Mary” … not Martha, but to Mary, let’s unpack a lesson for us from this.  Each of us is equipped with individual talents and personalities that have the power to influence and lead others for and to the Lord.  No one else can do what you can do for the Lord! 

What can I, what can you, and only you and I, in our own ways, using our unique personalities and talents, do for the Lord?  It doesn’t have to be big in man’s eyes for it to be BIG in God’s eyes!

Mary could have ‘not run to Jesus.’  In her grief she would have been justified in staying in her house where she was being comforted.  She could have seen Jesus later.  But that’s not what she did.  She ran to Jesus and fell at His feet with the confession that if He had been there, her brother would have lived.  I believe her love, faith and dedication to our Lord sent her running to Him … and as a result many believed.  Do our choices send us running to Jesus?  Do our choices help others believe?

Mary had two choices, stay or go … Mary chose the better!

Looking back over this lesson with Mary in mind we see that:

Mary had a heart for Jesus.

Mary was obedient to what Jesus said for her to do.

Mary ran to Jesus in her brokenness.

In lesson 1, we saw Mary ‘choose the better’ at a supper in her home, in today’s lesson we saw Mary ‘choose the better’ when her world lay crumbled at her feet.  Next week we’ll see Mary in yet another situation that is totally different.  Will she choose the better then also?

I hope you’ve enjoyed today's lesson.  Don't forget to leave a comment and if you're enjoying this study, please share the link with other ladies who you think might enjoy it as well.

Until the next class …

patsy @ From This Heart of Mine

Sources used for this study:

Various translations of the Holy Bible

Various commentaries

Dictionary of New Testament Background, Editors: Craig A Evans & Stanley E. Porter

Archaeological Study Bible

All the Women of the Bible by Edith Deen

Daughters of Eve by Lottie Beth Hobbs

Halley’s Bible Handbook by H. H. Halley

Who’s Who in the Bible by Philip Comfort & Walter A. Elwell